09/2/17

Removing Doubts & Obstacles When The Buddha’s Path Is Blocked


It’s not uncommon for Buddhists to feel like their practice has stalled. Concentration wavers, awareness is lost, doubts arise, and the Buddha’s supreme freedom from samsara seems hopelessly unattainable.  It can be an especially trying time if you’re a solitary practitioner lacking the guidance of a skilled meditation teacher. But it’s also an opportunity to straighten your views and re-affirm your refuge in the Triple Gem.

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12/17/16

Cultivating Wholesome Habits That Last

lasting-habits

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‘Tis the season for resolutions.  The tradition of making a New Year resolution can be a useful one for cultivating the kinds of wholesome habits that the Buddha recommended (generosity, compassion, mindfulness… etc.). Here’s a collection of habit-building tips that can stop any good intentions crashing and burning by the end of January 2017. Merry Christmas everyone!

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05/30/16

Working With The Five Hindrances – Ajahn Thiradhammo

Working With The 5 Hindrances - Thumbnail
“The theme of this book is working with the Five (Mental) Hindrances (nīvarana). It is thus perhaps mainly a book for people with some experience of meditation who have encountered these Hindrances, obstructions, disturbances to some degree, and who are interested in knowing how to work with them.” – Ajahn Thiradhammo…

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02/28/16

When Life Allegedly Sucks: Maintaining Resilience & Peace Of Mind

Newspapers
War, Famine, Pestilence, and Death…  The world’s troubles never cease – an uncomfortable truth graphically illustrated by the 24/7 litany of horror stories being broadcast by global media corporations in all formats. The bad news is, there are no magic bullet solutions. The good news is, there are skilful behaviours for maintaining resilience and calmness…

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10/22/15

Mindfulness Off The Cushion

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An enlightened being remains equanimous under any circumstances. If awareness is present we, too, can recognise all experiences as impermanent (anicca) and unsatisfactory (dukkha), and we can remain calm because we do not mistake them as ‘I’, ‘me’, ‘mine’ or ‘self’ (anatta). However, we are unlikely to develop and maintain this ability if our practice is confined to a daily session on a cushion in the shrine room at the appointed time.

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06/27/15

Aware & Present: Some Mindfulness Tips

The psychological problems associated with modern-day consumerist societies (unrealistic aspirations, warped opinions, extreme emotions, stress, etc.) are well documented and all too commonly felt. Similar problems appear to have existed also in the Buddha’s time, around 2500 years ago, when societies were arguably simpler. The Buddha saw that these perennial existential problems arose from delusion, aversion and craving (aka the ‘three fires’) and his solution was mindfulness…

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02/26/15

Intuitive Awareness – Ajahn Sumedho

Ajahn Sumedho (Image Credit - www.theravada-dhamma.org)

“There is a huge difference between the use of the mind to think, to analyse, reason, criticise, to have ideas, perceptions, views and opinions, and intuitive awareness which is non-critical… We’re not interested in just developing our critical faculty, because usually in countries like this it’s highly developed already, but to trust in intuitive awareness (sati-sampajanna).” – Ajahn Sumedho

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12/18/14

The Real Study – Ajahn Chah

Bronze Buddha Portrait
THE REAL STUDY

“The eight factors of the Eightfold Path of the Buddha, the path of practice, are nothing other than this very body: two eyes, two ears, two nostrils, one tongue, and one body. This is the Path. And the mind is the one who follows the Path. Therefore both the study and the practice exist in our body, speech, and mind…” – Ajahn Chah

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03/5/14

Attached Or Unattached?

Brass Buddha

Hopefully most meditators will at least be aware of the Five Precepts and doing their best to refrain from killing, stealing, sexual misconduct, unwholesome speech and intoxication.  However, it is also recommended for lay practitioners to observe the Eight Precepts on Uposatha days or days when one is free from work or household commitments. Observing the Eight Precepts strictly for just one day is a great test of one’s attachment to material comforts…

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