10/30/16

What Does “I Resolve Not To Kill But To Cherish All Life” Truly Mean?

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Buddhism is less about following rules and more about abandoning self-serving narratives. The Precept, “I resolve not to kill but to cherish all life”, must be understood on three levels – fundamentally as an exercise in mindfulness; flexibly as a guide to ethical living; ultimately as a meditation on selfless interdependence.
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08/20/16

Diet, Physical Exercise, and Buddhist Spiritual Practice

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The Buddha taught that suffering is rooted in attachment to all that’s beloved and pleasing yet destined to change and vanish. So why bother with working out and dietary management if my body will inevitably succumb to ageing, sickness and death? Should I not just let nature take its course, watch what happens and accept it all gracefully?

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07/29/16

Patience Mantra

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Experiencing life as a personal affront and entertaining denial and anger is not only physically/mentally draining but also stresses the people around us. Accepting the situation and not taking it personally, on the other hand, not only eases our suffering mind but is kinder to others and a sets a good example. Our patience may be strengthened by contemplating the following mantra on waking each morning…

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06/30/16

Meditating On Imminent Death, Planning For Terminal Decline

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Sickness, ageing and death are as much a part of the lifecycle as birth, youth and health. Yet our attitude and actions suggest that we don’t really understand these life experiences. My purpose in writing this post is to inspire a realistic and proactive attitude towards imminent death and terminal decline. In particular, I wish to highlight the urgent need for an end of life care and treatment plan.

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05/30/16

Working With The Five Hindrances – Ajahn Thiradhammo

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“The theme of this book is working with the Five (Mental) Hindrances (nīvarana). It is thus perhaps mainly a book for people with some experience of meditation who have encountered these Hindrances, obstructions, disturbances to some degree, and who are interested in knowing how to work with them.” – Ajahn Thiradhammo…

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04/29/16

Does Buddhism Have A Future?

Buddha and DevasDoes Buddhism have a future? Buddhism will almost certainly continue to diversify as practitioners adapt themselves to the current harsh realities of globalisation. The issues of Rationalism, Consumerism, and Activism, are especially liable to influence future perceptions of the religion. Whether or not Buddhism remains relevant beyond the 21st century, or is viewed increasingly as anachronistic, will depend largely upon the various Buddhist schools all being much clearer on what the foundational teachings actually are…

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03/30/16

The Experience Of Being: A Guided Meditation

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The fundamentals of existence are visible form or corporeality (Rupa); feelings of pleasure, pain or indifference (Vedana); names, allusions or perceptions (Sanna); conditioned mental formulations (Sankhara); and cogniscance, consciousness, or awareness (Vinnana). According to the Buddha, these five ‘aggregates’ are impermanent (anicca), unsatisfactory (dukkha) and not-self (anatta), and that is how we should contemplate them.

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02/28/16

When Life Allegedly Sucks: Maintaining Resilience & Peace Of Mind

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War, Famine, Pestilence, and Death…  The world’s troubles never cease – an uncomfortable truth graphically illustrated by the 24/7 litany of horror stories being broadcast by global media corporations in all formats. The bad news is, there are no magic bullet solutions. The good news is, there are skilful behaviours for maintaining resilience and calmness…

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